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Interview With Borgore [EDM Sauce Exclusive]

Before his show at Pacha, we had the chance to catch up with Borgore. Influences, up and coming artists, and future projects were among the many things we had to talk about. For those of you who are unaware, Borgore has been a dominant figure in the electronic dance music scene. He has collaborations out with Miley Cyrus, and Waka Flocka, among many other artists, and is the owner of his own Record Label, ‘Buygore.'

EDM Sauce: In a recent interview, DJ Hatcha mentioned that Israel was one of the first places to embrace Dubstep. How did that influence you as a musician from Israel?

Borgore: It just gave me an opportunity to start fucking with it 3 years before you guys heard of anything that is EDM. Give me a nice good start, I appreciate that I had the option to start making music way before it popped up.

EDM Sauce: In my opinion ‘Wayak' was one of the most beautiful songs you produced. What was your influence to produce it?

Borgore: I actually agree ‘Wayak' is probably my favorite song that I did. The thing is Dudu Tassa is a really big singer in Israel, he's like country, like Tim McGraw type of singer in Israel. He was like “Yo I'm making this song in Arabic, and I'm looking for a twist. What do you think of trying to play with it.,” and I was like “alright.”

EDM Sauce: Name your top 5 up and coming producers in the game right now.

Borgore: Riggi and Prios, Ookay, a dude named Don Farber from Israel, D.O.D.. The thing is there are so many people that I want to give a shout out to.

EDM Sauce: Who is your favorite personally?

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Borgore: I really appreciate Zedd cause he has a full on music background. He knows how to play the piano amazing, he knows how to play the drums amazing. All his songs are poppy, but they're different and they have depth to it. I appreciate that a lot.

EDM Sauce: I know you are from a metal background, have you ever thought of collaborating with any metal artists?

Borgore: I've already done it. I've done Bring Me The Horizon, Asking Alexandria, Hollywood Undead. I was touring with death metal bands for like 3 months or something.

EDM Sauce: What was it like working with Waka Flocka?

Borgore: Dude, Waka Flocka is probably the nicest person, as long as you don't piss him off 'cause he's huge. When you get him on his calm side, which is most of the time, he's probably the nicest person I know. He's just pure fun to chill with. I remember us in an airport in Canada after the flight got delayed, and he un plugged the monitors, and put in his Playstation, and we were playing for like half an hour before security got pissed at us.

EDM Sauce: What's coming up next for Borgore as an artist, and Buygore as a label?

Borgore: This year we have more showcases as Buygore. We have our own tent in some festivals, we have really big shows, really nice bills building up, and the people we sign are actually super talented, so I see a really good year for Buygore. For Borgore, I have a new release coming out on Spinnin' Records in April that already has like 600,000 listens in a week on Soundcloud. It's called ‘Unicorn Zombie Apocalypse.' Later around June I have a new album coming out that I think will do well because it's really weird, and ecliptic.

EDM Sauce: I know trance is heavy in Israel, how did you get introduced to Dubstep over there?

Borgore: There's a really really strong hipster scene in Tel-Aviv. Dubstep was like a hipster thing in 2007 before it became what it is. Then they kind of left into sexy trap. So, this is how I was introduced into it. I always liked trance…

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EDM Sauce: How did you go from making heavy tunes like ‘Nympho,' to housey tunes like ‘Booty Monsta.'

Borgore: My new album in June is a mix, people that actually love me for my heavy stuff, and I'm going to play some heavy stuff today, they will have some of that. I got bored of doing the same thing, and I studied music for God knows how long in private schools and stuff. I was just like “I'm ready to do other things.”

EDM Sauce: What influenced all these new genres and changes in producer's styles?

Borgore: Mate, at the end of the day we are playing a game of supply and demand. You can't ignore what's happening in the world, you can't put your head in the sand. If kids want to hear 128, or trap or whatever, I can still be Borgore and make house that will still sound like Borgore. I can be Borgore and make a polka song. I'm down for whatever challenge it is.

EDM Sauce: What's the difference between a sucker, and someone who really understand the music and is able to adjust to the scene?

Borgore: In my nature I'm inherently a jazz musician. I sit every day 3 hours listening to and playing jazz. You cannot really make a living out of jazz, plus I moved from jazz to metal, and from metal to electronic music because when you play jazz you are improvising fucking 200 BPM and playing the hardest changes. It's stuff that you need to be a genius to realize. There's a bunch of old men clapping their hands once in a while, and someone is half asleep. It's more of a social thing going to a jazz concert. I wanted to get a reaction you get in a EDM concert, you drop a big tune and everyone goes off…I enjoy music full on.

EDM Sauce: There's the new trap phenomenon and the twerk 100 BPM stuff. What do you think is the next trend in EDM?

Borgore: I think that everything in life comes in waves. Dubstep was gone for the last year, maybe it will be back this year. You cannot know, House was gone for a while, now all of a sudden Big Room is the hottest shit. You can't know. It comes in waves. Drum n Bass wasn't here, maybe Drum n Bass will come back. That's life.

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