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Alanis Morissette and James Corden Sing Updated Version of ‘Ironic’

Alanis Morissette's 1995 song “Ironic” may have been one of the biggest songs in the 90s by making the top five in Canada, the United States, Norway, and Australia. The song continued to reach peak success after being nominated for two Grammys. Despite its awards, “Ironic” always received some controversy about being about coincidences and not really irony.

Twenty years later, Alanis Morissette and James Corden decided to tackle an updated version of “Ironic” during The Late Late Show. During the song, Corden and Morissette talk about ironic things in today's culture, such as vaping, Southwest flights, Facebook, Snapchat and even Netflix.

An old friend sends you a Facebook request
You only find out they’re racist after you accept
There’s free office cake on the first day of your diet
It’s like they announce a new iPhone the day after you buy it
And isn’t it ironic, don’t you think?
It’s like swiping left on your future soulmate
It’s a Snapchat that you wish you had saved
It’s a funny tweet that nobody faves
And who would’ve thought it figures

It’s a traffic jam when you try to use Waze
A no-smoking sign when you brought your vape
It’s 10,000 male late-night hosts when all you want is just one woman, seriously!
It’s singing the duet of your dreams, and then Alanis Morissette shouting at you
And isn’t it ironic, don’t you think?
A little too ironic, and yeah I really do think

It’s like you’re first class on a Southwest plane
Then you realize that every seat is the same
It’s like Amazon but your package never came
And who would’ve thought it figures

It’s like Netflix but you own DVDs
It’s a free ride but your Uber’s down the street
It’s singing “Ironic,” but there are no ironies
And who would’ve thought it figures

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