A new study spearheaded by Help Musicians UK has determined that musicians may be up to three times more likely to suffer from depression as compared to the general public.

In 2016, Help Musicians UK commissioned the University of Westminster and MusicTank to undertake the largest known study of the working conditions of musicians. Help Musicians is the leading independent charity for musicians in the UK. The study has come out of the charity's Music and Depression campaign, an initiative dedicated to examining the prevalence of mental health issues in the music industry.

Over 2,000 self-selected respondents took part in the industry-wide survey. Around 70% of the participants have had experienced panic attacks or high levels of anxiety. Only about 30% of the group have said they sought help for these ailments. Preliminary findings suggested that while artists find comfort in the production of music, working in the music industry might be a reason for making musicians sick or at least contribute to their levels of ill mental health. Reasons that may contribute to this gap might contribute to poor working conditions or lack of recognition for one's work which can lead to the mental health problems a majority of musicians are facing.

The majority of survey respondents were between the ages of 18-35, they work among a variety of genres. Males and females were split almost evenly, with 55.2% of participants identifying as male, and 43.9% identifying as female. Pop, rock, and alternative music were some of the most prominent genres of music practiced by the sample group. Various professions were also represented, including musicians, DJs, live crew, and music management. The survey’s findings indicate that musicians appear to be suffering from anxiety and depression in significant numbers.

Help Musicians UK hopes to launch a nationwide mental-health service for music industry figures in 2017 which will follow the completion of the study's next phase. The previous survey that was completed represents a groundbreaking study that highlights the comprehension of mental health-related issues in the industry.This survey was the first glimpse into the mental health world of music artists and can illuminate potential areas for support for these musicians.

We look forward to covering this story in the future, check out the statistics below, and keep up to date with all of the latest in electronic music with us over at EDM Sauce!

(A special thanks to Help Musicians UK, Minds Matter Music, and MusicTank for the information towards such an important topic)