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Dirtybird Releases Long Awaited Shiba San Track

Dirtybird fanatics, rejoice. Dirtybird giant and Tech God alike, Shiba San has finally released Dirtybird's jam of the summer; ‘Up & Down'. Shiba San first started producing for Dirtybird nearly three years ago with his smash hit; Okay. Since then, he has been featured at many Dirtybird events as well as huge festivals such as Electric Forest (Second Weekend) and Decadence.

Similar to other techno singles, the track starts off abruptly almost immediately featuring it's catchy title lyrics “I go up and down”. These lyrics are accompanied by a heavy thumping baseline. Only seconds in, the track makes you want to just nod your head from up and down (ha ha), tap your feet and shake your hips. Suddenly the base line is removed to begin the first build. The vocals then are slowly distorted into unrecognizable synths. This combination of circling synths and discombobulated lyrics are remastered back into the signature “up and down” lyric and then the track drops. Shiba brings back an unimaginably heavier base line that is absolutely detonating. Then, true to the best tech tracks, a multitude of new sound samples are added to the mix one by one. First we have a whistling cadence that adds to the mysteriousness of the track. Then we also have the wobbley wompy sounding synth that is added at the end of every measure of music. Its hard to put to words… but you Dirtybird fanatics know what we're talking about. Unfortunately the track is only two minutes long, so just when you are falling in love, the heavy baseline and funky vocals are over.

Seeing Shiba live is like no other. His sets are legendary and completely mesmerize the crowd into a techno trance (no pun intended). Listen to some of his recorded sets here (nearly 24 hours worth of Shiba). And, catch him on his North American Spring 2017 tour coming to a city near you.

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