“I've got big boy problems, too,” Joel Zimmerman AKA Deadmau5 confessed on his Twitch steam this past week. The Mau5trap label head actually hoped his stance would reach the blog outlets as he opened up about his the most public of communication tools, Twitter, where his beef keeps the EDM media wagon running full speed into another year of ‘mau5traps.'

In a rant captured on video, Joel defending his purist integrity as an artist and bashed some dudes that are raking it in like Justin Bieber and peer Skrillex, whose beef with Zimmerman of late have caused some tension.

While he empathizes with Skrillex and his career choices by confessing that “he's a little hippie and he likes working with people,” the Bieber comments were a bit more aggressive.

“I can credit you (referring to Beiber) for being able to hold a pitch on two syllables on an entire 75-minute long album. If that's the credit you deserve, that's the credit you get,” Zimmerman explained.

His main rebuttal to comments online and drinking the Hatorde include the fact that he can't stand Bieber calls the album his.

“I can accept that his album is probably good. I have no qualms with that. I know decent production when i hear it. What I'm mad about is that none of it is this little (expletive) (expletive),” later referring to Bieber as a ‘meat puppet.'

Dropping another new tune this week on SoundCloud, Zimmerman explained why his style contrasts so much with other artists in electronic music with a bit more candid assertion.

“I've already tried to ruin my career and it doesn't work,” he explained.

“It sucks you can't put that on Twitter .. .you have to condense that (from) a 20 minute speech… it translates as this sucks… you suck.”

He thinks this might make him look like a “crybaby” from time to time, but judging by the amount of offense headed in his direction on the internet, Zimmerman's stance shouldn't surprise anyone.

Being able to express his opinion fully on a topic that tends to cause plenty of attention on a daily basis, this video has already been making the rounds outside of electronic music networks.