When you look back at the amazing journey that is electronic dance music, it's mindblowing to think that it's been 5 whole years since Electric Daisy Carnival was last held in Los Angeles, Swedish House Mafia was still together, the world was still awaiting a new Daft Punk album, and you could actually tell one mainstage act apart from another. Even before all of this buzz and excitement, in 2009, was when British electronic pioneers, The Prodigy, released their last record Invaders Must Die, and have since laid dormant while the scene they helped create exploded into a worldwide, cultural phenomenon and become a staple of the modern day entertainment medium. Now Liam Howlett and his two professional party animal frontmen, Maxim and Keith Flint, have returned with a vengeance to remind the world that they've been experts at delivering electronic synthesized filth and massive, demolishing beats way before the likes of Skrillex, Hardwell, Garrix, or any other festival bigshots that have soaked up the spotlight in recent years.

The Prodigy

With today's obsession with giant, mega produced stages and dance tunes, it makes it very easy for every song on The Day Is My Enemy to sound right at home in 2015, which isn't just a testament to the the stellar incorporation of numerous contemporary dance genres, from electro, dubstep and bigroom, but to the timeless and unmatchable style of the group themselves. It sounds like a Prodigy album from a mile away, and while there are noticeable new additions to the audio bank of grungy, harsh, and filthy noises that encompass the 14 track collection, make no mistake its big beat through and through. Not just any big beat mind you, this is the kind of soundtrack for trashing your room, breaking windows, setting objects aflame. Rebel Radio, Wild Frontier, and Get Your Fight On are among a few of the mosh pit, fist throwing, hyper aggressive jams that are fitting heirs to classics like Firestarter or Take Me To The Hospital.

Prodigy live

Sounding as if they haven't aged a minute, Maxim and Keith Flint, remain vital elements as maestros of the chaos, delivering career highlight performances throughout the whole experience, specifically in Ibiza and the eastern inspired Medicine. As far as hype men go, they may very well be the best in the business, and thats no exaggeration, especially when you imagine how much less awesome it'd be without their punkish one liners and high pitched shrieks throughout. There's also some sides of the Prodigy we haven't seen before. Invisible Sun is a slow tempo, but heavy sludger that still manages to sound just as massive as its adrenaline filled counterparts and Beyond The Deathray is a hypnotic, orchestral buildup that'll make your hairs stand and send shivers across your body.

The Prodigy NYE 2013

It's a joy to see a beloved music act age so gracefully, and The Prodigy seriously make it seem easy. There's not one tune on this album that sounds cheap or rushed, and even when compared to their impressive discography, The Day Is My Enemy is among the groups best work. Only Rage Against the Machine can create such grade-A riot music of this caliber. They're electronica's interpretation of punk rock, heavy metal, and rockabilly, which is why they've appealed to anyone who enjoys badass beats. The Day Is My Enemy is guaranteed to impress, and should prove as a perfect example how a classic sound can adapt with the times and actually up the ante in almost every way possible.

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The Day Is My Enemy
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