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H&M Are Being Sued For Selling Bootleg DJ Merchandise At Locations Around The Globe

H&M has a special place in the hearts of everyone. Where else can you buy cheap and trendy clothes that get destroyed after one wash/dry cycle? Well outside of cheap fashion H&M also has another specialty. The company loves selling music apparel. Unfortunately they do not always take the proper channels to get copyrights cleared before printing their logos or names onto their Clothes.

Just take a look at this piece below. The DJ/producer duo Classixx had a fan find a shirt of theirs being sold at H&M and obviously they were a little surprised. The Attorney for H&M called Classixx a “relatively unknown DJ duo” and said if the duo were to sue, H&M would seek to be refunded on legal fees. This itself is absolutely hilarious as H&M is known to play singles off of ‘Hanging Gardens' IN THEIR STORES.

This did not phase Classixx in the least who has decided to move forward with litigation. Their attorney released this statement:

“Our client attempted to resolve this amicably with H&M before going to court. But, despite H&M’s blatant infringement of Classixx’s trademark and publicity rights, it denied any liability, threatened Classixx with claims for costs and attorneys’ fees, and insultingly referred to the band as a “relatively unknown DJ duo.” Clearly, H&M, which has been known to broadcast Classixx music in its stores, is no friend to the artist. For H&M to profit by marketing and selling without consent “Classixx”-branded apparel at its stores around the world is bad, but responding in the manner it did is even worse. The band looks forward to their day in court.”

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